Get Involved

The BTA is at work across Oregon, in classrooms, on the streets, and advocating for a safe, accessible mix of transportation in our state.

Bicycle and Transportation System Plans Decoded

Sharrow photo by Metro RTO

Does your community’s Transportation System Plan (TSP) include policies, projects, and plans for a world-class bike network?Transportation System Plans (TSPs) are the guiding planning document for municipalities on creating a transportation system. The TSP identifies policies and projects that give direction on where to focus money and resources in the community over the next 20 years. The goal of the TSP is to create planned and livable communities and protect Oregon from the sprawl that plagues the rest of the United States. TSPs are required by Oregon law. Every municipality in Oregon is required to regularly update their TSP.

TSPs and bicycle planning
Sprawl is bad for bikes. Good bicycle networks require good urban planning. TSPs give communities the opportunity to incorporate policies that encourage bicycle use and bicycle projects and to prioritize funding for transportation projects. Many municipalities use the TSP as an opportunity to create a bicycle and pedestrian master plan. The master plan is a powerful stand-alone document that takes an in-depth look at the needs and opportunities of the community and creates a vision for an integrated bicycle network that allows for easy access for bicycle transportation and recreation.

The City of Portland’s Bicycle Plan for 2030 is one of the best examples of a bicycle master plan. The projects and policies in this plan intend to take Portland to a 25% mode share for bicycles.

TSPs: Not just for engineers and planners
TSPs are mandated to have a robust public outreach process. During the public outreach process, anyone can participate and weigh in on the priorities for the future as well as the specific projects and policies included in the TSP. You can be a powerful voice for bicycling during this process.

advocacy flowchart

How to get involved

1. Get informed. Review your community’s TSP and find the opportunities for public engagement. If you cannot find information on the TSP on your community’s website, contact the BTA.

2. Get engaged. Write letters, review draft documents, reach out to city council and the mayor, meet with city staff and be part of the citizen advisory committees. Download the Advocacy Toolkit (PDF) to find tips on effective communication with elected officials.

3. Join the Citizen Advisory Committee (CAC). This is one of the most effective ways to create a strong demand for bicycling in the TSP. The BTA advocates for at least one bicycle advocate to be included on any Citizen Advisory Committee.

How the BTA can help
Your voice strengthens the movement for world-class bicycle networks in Washington County, Hillsboro, Gresham, Wood Village, Portland, and other communities across Oregon. We want to help you get involved. We can direct you to upcoming opportunities in your area, and we will assist with model policies, project prioritization criteria, and strategies to make an impact in the process.


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